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term congressman talks about his role in the civil rights movement, race relations in the obama event political partisanship on capitol hill, he has written wind: a memoir of the movement," "across that bridge: life lessons and a vision for change" and "march: book 1". >> congressman john lewis, who is elwin wilson? >> guest: i'd met him in 1961. i was part of the freedom ride. we left washington d.c. on may 4th, 1961, at 18 of us, to test the decision of the united states supreme court to end segregation in public transportation. my seatmate from washington d.c. you must understand in 1961, black people and white people couldn't be seen together when you get out of washington to try to go to north carolina or georgia, alabama, mississippi. we were on our way to new orleans. we didn't have any problems for the most part until we got to rock hill and the little place in charlotte, n.c. a young african-american man attempted to get a shoe shine in a so-called white barber shop that was in the so-called white waiting room. he was arrested and taken to jail. the jurors dismissed charges a
for the lawyers' committee for civil rights under law, my first visit in the white house as an attorney was when that committee was formed. and we have robert kengle with us who has won awards from the civil rights division, from the attorney general's award for excellence, information technology, adjunct law professor at georgetown law center. and i'm pleased to recognize you at this time. >> thank you so much, mr. chairman, on behalf of those lawyers' committee for civil rights -- on behalf of the lawyers committee, i'm very pleased and honored to be asked to address you today. i guess my roll is somewhat as a proxy for the department of justice, and more specifically, the civil rights division. i was in the voting section of the civil rights division for about 20 years, and i was out on sick leave during the last governmental shutdown, so i'm not sure exactly how that was handled. but i can tell you that section five work was highly prioritized been and that they were a sensual employees designated to look at section five submissions. as i'll mention a few minutes this picture is a little dif
to be killedas for civil-rights.wao of the people blamed the i was not for a -- dallas but for lee harvey oswald.rica o 70 policemen and a crowded sry basement that deprived america of the rest of the story.d. iv trial, and i choose todn't fg explain, people felt itoffials o never happened did they could not forget or forgive m for letting the most famous yams murder be murdered on live television with 70 people protecting him. >> host: who is still surviving war what happened?ctiv >> the major player have long died but today the noheast detective jim lapel he is still alive in his 90s. lee harvey oswald's widow is a life into his children.it. the of people are stille wtnes living by schieffer a and dan rather have greatre ale. stories there were severalb hundred witnesses that arery. still alive people that new ther laws called some of them heard the rifle shots --y. even the governor connallyancily ladybird johnson, nydia of those ancillary participants are still alive if. >> host: newark new jersey ibnaud or the first call. go-ahead. >> caller: i am currentlyprojec an a high-school fast to do
and racially coded rhetoric. when president johnson signed the civil rights act of 1964, he said, quote, we've lost the south for a generation. it didn't take long for republicans to exploit that idea. notorious gop strategist lee atwater laid it out. how republicans could exploit racial views without being explicitly racist. >> you start out in 1954 by saying [ bleep ], by 1968 you can't say [ bleep ]. that hurts you, backfires. so you stay stuff like forced bussing, states rights and stuff like that. all that stuff you're talking about are totally economic things and blacks get had hurt worse than whites. >> republicans started using those to their advantage. running shameful ads specifically targeting those views. >> his revolving door prison policy gave weekend furloughs to murderers not for parole. one was willie horton who murdered a boy. you needed that job. and you were the best qualified, but they had to give it to a minority because of a racial quota. against racial quotas, jesse helms. >> this sort of resentment has been stoked by the right. we've heard for decades of talk about
next speaker grew up in the civil rights movement led by her uncle, dr. martin luther king. but also with her father, reverend a.d. king, and her mother, naomi king. she currently serves as a pastoral associate and director of african-american outreach for priests for life and gospel of life ministries. she's also a voice for the silent no more awareness campaign sharing her personal testimony about abortion, god's forgiveness and healing. she is the recipient of the life pride award and also the cardinal john o'connor pro-life hall of fame in 2011. she's also a best-selling author. among her books is "how can the dream survive if we murder the children." ladies and gentlemen, would you please welcome to the podium right now, dr. alveda king. [applause] >> praise the lord. praise the lord. praise the lord. hallelujah. praise the lord. thank you so much. can you raise your hands just like this for a second and help me just a little bit, and then i have some words to share. ♪ then sings my soul my savior god to thee take it to the end. how great thou art how great thou art ♪ glory
claims of civil rights activism still roam free to confuse the masses with their deception. , nonds, nick no mistake matter our political affiliations or our church denominations or our personal we areissue of the day, now called together to humbly fight the good fight. yes, yes, yes. so together in unity and love for humanity, we gird ourselves with the truth. of faith. a shield our sort is not a spinning soundbite or a focus group, but the word of god. please permit me to give you a personal confession. regretsop of my list of are the deaths of three of my children. one through miscarriage and to buy abortion. down the list, i regret having said to a group of peers that my uncle dr. martin luther king jr. was a republican. grandfather, dr. martin luther king senior was a registered republican, but uncle ml was an independent. as a rich and and civil rights activist, he follows the path of not publicly endorsing a political party or candidate. not the servant> or master of either. i am not inextricably bound to your party. as one who has been elected to the georgia house of representativ
of the house, including longtime civil rights activist john lewis, were arrested after refusing police orders to move during an immigration rights rally. the senate passed an immigration reform bill back in the spring, but it has yet to come to a vote in the house. tom hanks' memorable roles have forded him fame, fortune, and countless awards. but he's revealed the cost to that career--type two diabetes. talking to david letterman last night, hanks says that the extreme weight swings he's undergone in movies like philalphia and castaway, have taken a toll on his health. type two diabetes is the most common form of the diabetes, affecting just under 26 million people, or eight percent of the u-s population. ad lib toss to vytas he must be cranking up the puff daddy at the treasury department, because when it comes to beating counterfeiters this week, it's all about the benjamins. we'll tell you how they're giving the c-note a face lift. and maybe the next thing they'll ban is chocolate milk. wait till you hear the chihood game that's being banned from the playground of one elementary school. i
a building site. it's all costing billions of dollars. union and civil rights groups asking, what will be the human toll of this? al jazeera, doha. >> reducing the government's foreign migrant population. cut access to free health care and housing for people who can't prove they have the right to stay in britain. but opponents of the system think it will put lives at risk. lawrence lee reports. >> for almost 70 years health care for everyone has been one of the things that britain has been most proud of yet it's difficult for migrants to get medical support. they reported that doctors are increasingly demanding a passport and proof of residence before they agree to treatment. as a result they say people like this young man from vietnam are unable to see a doctor. in some cases the results are life-threatening. >> people who are pregnant, not receiving are natal care, until very late. an example of a mother who gave birth by herself on a bathroom floor. >>> under the plans some migrants would have to pay up front into the health service. more dramatically, the same service would de
the democrats to pass the civil rights act, not a bunch of all editions in washington. it was people. they didn't stop protesting. say, -- stop saying, i will be respected, and today we are passing through a movement much like african- american movement, much like women, what's like the lgbt community. that's why i believe it's going to happen. you cannot stop justice. >> the memoir written by congressman luis gutierrez. he is the voice for 20 years and immigration real reform. as always, a delight to have you on this program. coming up, actress jeanne tripplehorn. stay with us. jeanne tripplehorn has made her mark costarring in movement but -- movies with michael douglas and tom cruise and the award- winning series "big love" and "criminal minds." is latest movie "mad men" directed and cowritten by her husband. >> i don't believe in coincidences, so i can't help thinking for some reason our paths keep crossing. somehow you are supposed to be here. and i'm supposed to be here. somehow, we've managed to find each other. >> how could you ever help me? >> you tell me. i was teasing jeanne this mov
. also, happy birthday to actor matt damon. civil rights activist jesse jackson is 72. >>> here's what's coming up later. the investigation into how a 9-year-old boy made it through security and on to a plane without anyone noticing. >>> and tinsel town treasures hitting the auction block next month. keep it here for more news, weather, and sports. i'm richard lui. have a very good day ahead. out of san francisco where a baby dies at the hospital. police are calling the death suspicious and homicide investigators are now on the scene. >> more than $1 million of drugs now off the streets this morning, but the mastermind behind this ring on the loose. we'll have details. >> plus, still no deal but no plans to strike either. the latest on negotiations to keep b.a.r.t. trains rolling this friday morning. >> right now a live look outside. i believe that is from the south bay, the lights look extra illuminated to juice up your morning. this is "today in the bay."
parents hired the same civil rights attorney who represented the family of trayvon martin. >> these parents sent their child to school with his book bag and he was returned to them in a body bag. >> reporter: they are pushing for the school to release more images from gym surveillance cameras. so far the only angle made public doesn't show how johnson ended up in the mat leaving the family with more questions. >> we're going to fight to the end. until we get justice for kendrick. >> reporter: for many, a death so strange it's proving hard to let go. gabe gutierrez, nbc news, georgia. >>> coming up next here tonight, spectacular pictures of what the astronauts witnessed from a window of the international space station. ♪ >>> a sure sign of the season outside our nbc news headquarters here in new york, the rockefeller center ice skating rink opened today with temperatures around 70 degrees. skaters took to the rink regardless perhaps wondering if the ice would melt below their feet. >>> a look at some out-of-this world pictures from the international space station. the ast
will argue to uphold the ban against the coalition to defend affirmative action. the civil rights activists group who will argue against it. >> i really feel a responsibility. >> kevin gain as professor of history and african-american studies at the university of michigan is among many names in the suit opposed to proposal 2. >> it is a very lonely position to have to feel that you have to fight battles that you had thought had been fought, and won. years ago. >> since proposal 2 took effect, the number of black and latino students entering the state's public universities has dropped by a third. professor gains believed the ban on affirmative action is blocking out diversity. >> there's a misconception out there, that race con, admissions is all about admitting someone based on the color of their skin and nothing else, and nothing could be phut fresh the truth. >> but proposal disagree, among them is jennifer great whose in 1997, was denied admission to the university of michigan and claimed she was the victim of discrimination. >> i believe in equality, i believe that people should be trea
could lose meals. furloughs affect deliveries. college sexual assault by civil rights office on hold. approval of new home mortgages stalled. because banks and lenders can't get paperwork from the irs and social security administration. this affects 15,000 new home mortgages per day. cdc tracking of disease outbreaks. biomedical research suspended across the board and across the country in universities and hospitals from cardio reserve to oncology. 3,000 faa flight safety inspectors. and fda employees and food inspectors. that's just some of it. we also learn defense secretary chuck hagel ordered almost all 350,000 furloughed civilian employees become to work based on interpretation of military readiness. great deal is a rerun of the sequester in which we normalize something, something, severe by getting used to it over time. over time it looks more and more like the government it produces is the right-wing's ideal version of government. what is hit the hardest are things they don't want the government doing any way. as soon as the government shuts down something they care about or m
in the civil rights movement. they have had a good reputation. that is what people think they do. that is not really what they do. they were founded in 1971 by attorneys morris deeds and joseph levine, jr. they were selling cook books, door, and tractor seat cushions. deeds became a top fundraiser for mcgovern and kennedy. allegedly, the story goes, he was able to get the mailing list from these candidates to springboard the funding efforts of the organization, which were very successful. the southern poverty law center has millions of dollars in and lots of offshore accounts. the american institute of philanthropy has given an f grade for their excessive reserves. their main business is attacking and suing conservative organizations. peoplee out to destroy like the family research council, american family association, and people like you. let me give you an idea of some of the things they do. they have a hate map. -- 1018 groups. crime, hatecs on crimes between 1996 and 2011 decreased by 29%, while the number of hate groups identified rose 69%. a little strange. others enforcem
. it has always had a history of helping people in the civil rights movement. they have had a good reputation. that is what people think they do. that is not really what they do. they were founded in 1971 by attorneys morris deeds and joseph levine, jr. books,re selling cook door, and tractor seat cushions. s became a top fundraiser for mcgovern and kennedy. allegedly, the story goes, he was able to get the mailing list from these candidates to springboard the funding efforts weree organization, which very successful. the southern poverty law center has millions of dollars in lotsng and endowments and of offshore accounts. the american institute of philanthropy has given an f sclc. to the splc. they are out to destroy people like you. hate is a cottage industry. that's me give you an idea of some of the things they do. of 1000 18 map groups -- 1018 groups. crime, theics on hate crimes between 1996 and 2011 decreased by 29%. at the number of hate groups the by 60%.e when law enforcement looked into this list, they found that many of these groups do not exist. they are not to be trus
. eight house democrats, including civil rights icon commerce member john lewis, were among those to taint, joining with immigration activists for sit in on a street of one of the capital. the lawmakers were arrested after addressing a crowd of thousands of people. immigration reform has stalled in the house after the senate approved a landmark measure in june. libya's general national congress has called on the u.s. to return a top al qaeda suspects seized this week from the streets of tripoli. theanas al-liby, wanted for 1998 usm as he bombings in east africa, is being held on a navy ship in the mediterranean sea. he is apparently been interrogated without an attorney and denied maranda rights. his arrest sparked rallies in libya and new pressure on the beleaguered libyan government. on tuesday, the libyan justice minister called his capture the kidnapping. we have made it clear to the u.s. government this is an act of kidnapping of the libyan citizen that does not comply with libyan law. a statement from libby is general congress approved tuesday says the u.s. should return abu anas al-
rights. >> there is an aspect of that. there was a backlash on the civil rights, there was also -- there was also a feel that -- in the urban north where you have a lot of these large cities and you got riots and things like that, richard nixon was running not a pure racial strategy, but more of a love of order. >> that's always the great mystery, we saw law and order, was that a code word in some way? one of the lessons we learned from that era too, we talked about racism in the south, sort of white ethnic backlash. >> we can call it code words if we want to, but it was a reaction to things that -- where people were seeing on their television. it looked like -- not looked like, cities were burning, and nixon -- nixon felt that that kind of an approach is going to resonate. but, i mean, it is not racist if there is -- if you actually are seeing these things -- you feel the need to respond to those. >> let's go back before the riots. you were talking about bill buckley. bill buckley was a racist. he believed that white people were superior to black people, and he said that white
terrorism. but the fc lc and many others who count hate and anger and false claims of civil rights activism still roam free to confuse the masses with their deception. friends, nick no mistake, no matter our political affiliations or our church denominations or our personal desire issue of the day, we are now called together to humbly fight the good fight. yes, yes, yes. so together in unity and love for humanity, we gird ourselves with the truth. we carried a shield of faith. our sort is not a spinning soundbite or a focus group, but the word of god. please permit me to give you a personal confession. at the top of my list of regrets are the deaths of three of my children. one through miscarriage and to buy abortion. down the list, i regret having said to a group of peers that my uncle dr. martin luther king jr. was a republican. yes, my grandfather, dr. martin luther king senior was a registered republican, but uncle ml was an independent. as a rich and and civil rights activist, he follows the path of not publicly endorsing a political party or candidate. he once wrote, not the servant
to civil rights leader, reverend al sharpton is here to talk about his brand-new book on his life's journey. screen writer john ridley -- >> ridley is back! and he's angry. he's coming after you, willie. >> i don't think he is. >> it's like frank gifford. holy cow! humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? (knochello? hey, i notice your car is not in the driveway. yeah. it's in the shop. it's going to cost me an arm and a leg. that's hilarious. sorry. you shoulda taken it to midas. get some of that midas touch. they tell you what stuff needs fixing, and what stuff can wait. next time i'm going to midas. high-five! arg! i did not see that coming. trust the midas touch. for brakes, tires, oil, everything. (whistling) stick with innovation. stick with power. stick with technology. get the flexcare p
. >> okay. >> that's the sequence of events. >> who is challenging. >> a group of civil rights advocates. >> civil rights people who want. >> defend o. firmive action. >> how many states right now have no affirmative action in, say, universities in hiring? do we know? >> california just the ninth circuit said the referendum that the california passed banning affirmative action was okay. so the reason the supreme court took this is now. >> i'm just wondering how many states have this kind of stuff. we don't know? we'll find out. >> this is a ripe issue that they have tried to not. >> i'm agreeing. >> the supreme court is going it uphold no affirmative statements in action that states voted it out. >> the voters voted for this it. >> a big states rights issue. >> this is in colorado. we predicted this would happen here. the left wing press went wild. more and more school districts are saying that if you are a transgendered person, you know, they are not subjective. you you don't have to prove that you can two and use any bathroom you want. any locker room you want. >> right. >> what's happ
that kelly was a seminal national event like the civil-rights killing of the 1960's as if he was somehow not familiar with the stigma that continued to tarnish his home town. the public has the right to know if the murder was really a hate crime or if not, what was the? the cop was shrugging doubtfully almost as if the afterthought he flashed me another smile but his eyes told me to let sleeping dogs lie. >> my hope was rather than read a lot from the book which i hope you will read your souls i would just like to have a discussion in the conversation why i wrote the book and why i will travel all over the country to talk did bookstores the and the colleges and book festivals and book fares because i think it is worth having the conversations that create violent events like this. so i would love to entertain some questions to have a conversation about whatever it is our what i hope to achieve or anything you want to ask diana open to any questions you would like to ask about the book. >> my question may be more detailed but it seems like there are a lot of people killed over drugs that i
to the new york "star ledger" he was among the first african-american executives and active in the civil rights in the 1960s. with less than a week to go before the election, booker canceled all campaign events for the day. cary booker was 76 years old. >>> sticking with gubernatorial politics, there's a boost in the race for virginia's politics. douglas wilder is throwing support between democrat terry mcaulla. wilder says the fact that mcauliffe has never held a position in office is a plus. he is leading the race currently by eight points. >>> washington's first talks over the debt limit gave the markets, i would say it's an understatement to say, it gave them a bounce. 323 points to the upside in the dow. that's the second best day of the year across all markets. we are now back above 15,000 in the dow and inching closer to 1700 in the s&p. steve sedgwick is live for us this morning. good morning, steve. >> yes, the markets are doing exactly what you expect them to do. if we get a deal, there's a risk on environment. if we don't get a deal, then all bets are off and the market contin
think with the national attention and the hiring of ben krim as a lawyer, maybe everyone a civil rights case will arise from this. >> the question is who is going to reopen this case. there was, and i think everybody agrees that at a local level, there was certainly a botched investigation. it took too long for authorities to call and basically determine whether there was an accident here or kwl somebody was at fault. is there a federal-type of charge that could be involved? and that's the issue. >> the blood on the wall is interesting. it's not kendricks, they determined. so the question is whose is it it? 14 inches round. it seemed odd from the beginning. john if anyone thought a child would go so far. you would think he would be big enough to push himself out. i think that there's so many other factors that point to some kind of blunt force trama to this child's head and neck. >>> we're going to move on to the biker story up in new york which has also sort of grabbed a lot of attention around the world. there's a lot of folks who could be facing charges in this what do you think they
policies and causes like education, a living wage, and civil rights. as first lady, she held regular press conferences and invited only women reporters to cover them. and she was the first first lady to travel overseas without the president, the first to address a national political convention, and the first to write her own daily syndicated column. join us for a two-hour program as we explore the life and legacy of eleanor roosevelt on first ladies, influence and image, next monday live on c-span, c-span 3, and c-span radio. offering a special edition of the book, first ladies of the united states of america, presenting a biography and a portrait of each first lady and comments from noted historians on the role of first ladies throughout history. available for the discounted price of $12.95 plus shipping at c-span.org/products. the website has more including a special section, welcome to the white house, produced by our white house historical association. chronicling the first ladies. find out more at c-span.org/first ladies. west virginia senator joe manchen spoke to reporters about the
education, a living wage, and civil rights. as first lady, she held regular press conferences and invited only women reporters to cover them and she was the first first lady to travel overseas without the president. the first to address a national political convention, and the first to write her own daily syndicated column. join us for a two-hour program as we explore the life and legacy of eleanor roosevelt on first ladies, influence and image next monday, live it 9:00 3,m. eastern on c-span, c-span and c-span radio. we are offering a special edition of the book, "first ladies of the united states of presenting a biography and portraits of the first ladies. it is available for the 1295 --ed price of $12.95. aboutbsite has more the first ladies including a special section, welcome to the white house. produced by our harner. cycling life in the mansion during the first tenure of the first ladies. >> the shutdown entering its third week. c-span is asking for your thoughts. >> the parties need to grow up and so this so people can get back to work. how can you go to a different country and ta
down search. the woman says her civil rights were violated. five more women also claimed that the same deputies from the same counties forcibly stripped searched them. a federal judge ordered today that all videos of the strip searches will be preserved. >> they threw to the ground and all four of them started taking her clothes off immediately. that indicates to me that this was a particularly neat approach. >> the sheriff's department has not commented on the allegations. expire leaves several families homeless today. claims porterhouse and jumped next door.the flames a tour thre house and jumped next door. the fire broke out after midnight when a young mother woke up to the sound of breaking glass. one person was treated for an asthma attack and a firefighter suffered chest pains and the fire is under investigation. >> water quality may have been attacked on pregnancies.an effee kid who snuck onto the flight to las vegas may have other transportation issues. a school in new york is batting balls on the playgroun this morning dare to turn up the volume and make it last all night. [ f
will be at my civil rights organization's headquarters. the national action network's house of justice on 145th street in harlem. 9:00 a.m. to noon. i hope to see you all there. this is a long weekend, a good weekend for reading. this book deals with your rejection in society and in the rejections we may have personally. i grew up having to deal with a single person home rejected by my dad. i had to get past insecurities. this is political, but it'
rights watch content. shooting civilance as well as shooting at people trying to get away. at least 190 people were killed and around 200 people from the area are still being held hostage. >> they continue to hold over 200 citizens from the villages. we are urging these groups to release the hostages. >> reporter: five groups including an al-qaeda-backed group planned the funding, and carrying out of attacks. in the investigation the rights group found an image in an opposition video of what looked like a man's son lying in bed. a resident confirmed it was him. he has a good idea of who might have killed and buried his wife and son at the back of their home. the graffiti reads we are coming. >>> okay. still much more to come on this news hour, including . . . ♪ ♪ >>> a new reform package gives home to some minorities in turkey, but others say they are not impressed. >>> and we'll tell you why music lovers in japan are still burning for the traditional compaq disk. >>> and in sport formula one fans mourn over the death of a female test driver. >>> first a car bomb has exploded in ben
policy and causes like education and raising wage and civil rights. she held regular press conferences as first lady and invited only women reporters to cover them. and she was the first lady to travel overseas without the president. the first to address a national political convention in the first to write her own daily syndicated column. join us for a two-hour program as we explore the life and legacy of eleanor roosevelt on the influence and image of the first ladies next monday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span, c-span3, and c-span radio. >> and we are offering a special edition of the book, first ladies of the united states of america, presenting a portion of each first lady and comments from noted historians from the role of first lady throughout history. it is available of the price of 1290 -- $12.95 plus shipping. welcome to the white house is produced by the white house historical association. it details the tenure of each first lady. find out more at c-span.org lash first ladies. >> you are watching c-span2 at politics and public affairs featuring live coverage of the u.s. senat
's murder, i reminded him that the killing was a seminal national event a lot like the civil rights killings of the 1960s. as if he were somehow unfamiliar with the stigma that continued to tarnish his hometown. the public has a right to know whether the murder was really a hate crime, i said with conviction, and if not, what was it in the cop stared at me as he sank back from his desk, shrugging doubtfully. almost as an afterthought, he flashed me another knowing grin. but again, his eyes told me to let sleeping dogs lie. my hope was that rather than read a lot from the book -- which i hope you will read yourselves -- [laughter] what i'd like to do is just have a discussion and a conversation. that's really why i wrote this book and why i'm going to travel all over the country over the next two months to talk in bookstores, at colleges, at book festivals and book fairs. because i think that it's worth really having conversations about the complexities that create violent events like this. and so what i'd love to do is maybe entertain some questions and have a conversation with you about wha
. for this movement i will be get arrested. an icon of the civil rights movement we are really broadening our movement. we are in such a better place. >> you have been disappointed with the president who is a fellow chicagoian. you in your book are tough on the pred ee presiden ee presideu believed he would lead the way for immigration reform and it hasn't happened. >> look i sat down with the president and he said, will you support me? i have to tell you, i didn't ask him for an ambassadorship. i didn't ask for him to give me a princple roll i didn't ask him to be anything other. will you lead and champion the cause of the immigration reform no member of the hi hispanic congressional caucus was with him. i was with him. every other member was with hillary clinton and he got beaten in la and chicago and new york and miami. check the tallies. hillary clinton beat him among hispanics in every state and municipal and village across the country. i stood with him and i expect him to stand with our community. he said imaut i'm going to passn the first year of my administration. that is my priority. so much
not be accorded the same civil rights as british citizens. because they thought they had to keep the american colonists at they are whatever, so they were not according american a colonist the same rights. richmond franklin became a whistleblower and 70 and 73, all -- ben franklin became a whistleblower in 1773, only to be called every name of the book by the british and the american governor at the time. he was stripped of his postmaster general status. and timee how history changes everything. and the case of benjamin franklin, changed rather quickly. pre-k's let's go to edward snowden in his own words in his interview with glenn greenwald in june fromtrus hong kong when he first revealed who he was. snowden explained why he made the decision to become a whistleblower. >> when you're in positions of privileged access like a systems adststststrastr for the intelligence agencies, you're exposed to a lot more information on a broader scale than the average employee. because of that, you see things that may be disturbing, but over the course of a normal person's career, you would only see one o
with their flashers going and tremendous number of people in there exercising their first amendment right, civil disobedience. the gate was kicked open. going and seeing that memorial to a great man the way it should be, open and available right now, without the excuses and rented barricades. but i also want to touch a little bit on the health care side as we're going through this , i appreciate you saying it's not just challenges but the opportunities. and frankly, we need to be talking to each other to get hrough those solutions, this #time4solutions. and a senate leader has said no negotiations. we are finally getting there. they are hearing from their constituents back home that we need you to be talking. same with the white house. the white house came around a little sooner than what the senate leader did but time to make sure we are having these negotiations and these conversations. a lot of us know the challenges. many of them are very well known. glitches. they might be charitable on what was going on but something that one of my colleagues, mike rogers, had put forward an op-ed not that
, and as a civil servant, right now i cannot speak about it. >> who can we get answers from? >> i think it has to be at un headquarters. >> in new york? >> it is. i don't know whether you'll get an answer at this point, but the people who are reviewing this are at headquarters, they're in the legal department and they're working with the secretary-general's office on this. >> we followed nigel's advice. it seemed like the only way of getting any answers for the families in haiti was to head to where all those decisions are seemingly taken - new york. millions who need assistance now. we appreciate you spending time with us tonight. >>> up next is the golden age of hollywood going golden but elsewhere. why l.a.'s mayor has declared a state of emergency for the entertainment industry there. next. [[voiceover]] no doubt about it, innovation changes our lives. opening doors ... opening possibilities. taking the impossible from lab ... to life. on techknow, our scientists bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life. w
. as an official here in haiti, and as a civil servant, right now i cannot speak about it. >> who can we get answers from? >> i think it has to be at un headquarters. >> in new york? >> it is. i don't know whether you'll get an answer at this point, but the people who are reviewing this are at headquarters, they're in the legal department and they're working with the secretary-general's office on this. >> we followed nigel's advice. it seemed like the only way of getting any answers for the families in haiti was to head to where all those decisions are seemingly taken - new york. on august 20th, we'd travelled from haiti to new york to get answers for the families who'd waited more than a year for the un to respond to their lawsuit over the cholera outbreak. but before we even arrived at un headquarters, we got word from mario's legal partners in the us that a decision had already been made. >> they sent me an email shortly before they made the public announcement, they sent me an email with the letter. >> what did it say? >> the letter was one paragraph about how the un was sorry about the
and center on the issue of civil rights and now he is sharing the journey that made his the political figure he is today. it's called al sharpon the and the path to american leadership. good to see you. >> good to be here. >> you talk about your childhood and loss and abandonment. loss of a father figure. you talk about being a strange kid. you used to sign reverend al sharpton on your school papers and your teachers didn't think it was funny. were you an outcast? >> i was. i started preaching in the church when i was 4. and i was their schoolmate and it was rough getting girlfriends too. >> you talk about learning from mistakes. learning from your missteps. how did those lessons learned impact the guy you are today? more forgiving? >> more forgiving and more strategic. many of the things i was involved in, in civil rights i would have done but i would have done them different. you start saying wait a minute, i owe it to people that believe in the cause i'm representing to be more cautious, more careful, and more strategic in what i'm presenting. >> i've known you for a long time. you will b
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